Current Exhibitions


Industrial PhotographyIndustrial Photography by Laurie Ann Orlovsky
Through September 14, 2014

This gallery envisions how art, industry, and technology are making a crescendo of connections as the 21st century advances. In Tech: 2020, the framing and scale, light and color, and rhythm and form interact to present images of a not too-distant future, halfway between the postmodern milieu and the ambiguities of perception.

Image courtesy of the artist.


Nano LogoNano: The Science of the Super Small
Through September 28, 2014

Nano is an interactive exhibition that engages family audiences in nano-scale science, engineering, and technology. Hands-on stations present the basics of nanoscience and engineering, introduce some real world applications, and explore the societal implications of this new technology. Nano was created by the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Network) with support from the National Science Foundation.

 

 


Native American PotteryLegacy in Clay: Contemporary American Indian Pottery
Through September 28, 2014

This exhibition features over 50 exquisite examples of contemporary pottery, created by American Indian potters, all recent gifts from the Collection of Sonia and Victor Bauer.  Including bowls, pots, and jars dating from 1993-2008, this exhibition explores the forms, designs, and methods that contemporary potters have created with inspiration from ancient traditions.  For example, Iris Nampeyo (c. 1860-1942), one of the most well-known Hopi potters, was a pioneer in reviving Sikyatki designs, infusing them with her own creativity.  She passed down her designs and techniques to her daughter, Fannie, who passed along the craft to her children and grandchildren.  Pieces by Nampeyo’s grandchild, Iris Youvella Nampeyo and great-grandchild Rayvin Nampeyo, are included in the exhibition.  The exhibition also includes the work of Jody and Polly Rose Folwell, Al Qoyawayma, Dorothy Torivio, Damian Toya, and Nancy Youngblood. A broad range of Hopi, Laguna, Acoma, Santa Clara and Navajo traditions are represented.  The delicate shapes and detailed designs demonstrate an incredible level of craftsmanship and talent.  In addition, the exhibition includes an exquisite selection of contemporary Kachina Dolls carved from cottonwood by highly skilled Hopi artists to represent various spirits of their religion.  Works by Loren Phillips and Orin Poley, among others are included.

Informal Science Education Network (NISE Network) with support from the National Science Foundation.

Related Programs (see links for tickets and additional information):

American Indian Cultures of the Southwest with Twig Johnson, September 17

Image: Dorothy Torivio, Black and white geometric seed jar, Hand coiled earthenware, 1995. Gift of Sonia W. and Victor J. Bauer.


Shawn-WolfPortrait of an Athlete: Special Olympics of New Jersey & U.S. Paralympics
Through November 16, 2014

The Special Olympics USA Games will be hosted by New Jersey June 14-21, 2014. Nearly 3,500 athletes will compete in 16 Olympic-style team and individual sports, with the support of 1,000 coaches, 10,000 volunteers and 70,000 family, friends and spectators.  In celebration of the accomplishments of the New Jersey Special Olympics athletes, the Morris Museum is proud to present this exhibition of portraits by photographer Pete Byron, who has travelled all over the state to capture the athletes during practice, competition, or just being themselves. 

nj humanitiesNEW Safilo Group (2)Support for Portrait of an Athlete provided by Safilo and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities. Safilo, the exclusive global eye wear supplier to the Special Olympics- Lions Club International Opening Eyes® vision care program since 2003.

Image: Shawn Woolf. Image courtesy of Pete Byron. 


al green pottery websitePottery by Albert Green
Ongoing

For more than fifty years until his death in 1994, Albert Green produced works of genius that continue to influence the ceramic world today. Through years of experimentation and study, Albert was able to teach himself the intricacies of clay and glazes.  Simple utilitarian forms – the bowl, the bottle, the plate – became Albert’s canvases, allowing him to concentrate on the interplay of color and design which graces the surface of every piece.